President's Letter
Tech Camp Nepal & Migration Learning Tour
KnowTheChain
Trafficking in Persons Report
Alliance to End Slavery and Trafficking (ATEST)
Free and Fair Labor in Palm Oil Production
Burundi
South Sudan: The Search for Peace Continues
Liberia
Program Data
Investments List
Photo by Chris Kelly / The Guardian

HUMANITY UNITED

2015 Performance Report

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1
President's Message
2
Tech Camp Nepal & Migration Learning Tour
3
KnowTheChain
4
Trafficking in Persons Report
5
ATEST
6
Free and Fair Labor in Palm Oil Production
7
Burundi
8
South Sudan: The Search for Peace Continues
9
Liberia
10
Program Data
11
Investments List
1

PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE

Even in the face of often desperate situations, our extended family is bringing new energy, ideas and enthusiasm to address these widespread and persistent global problems.

_

Dear friends,

I am pleased to share with you Humanity United’s performance report for 2015.

In this report, you will find information about our grants and activities throughout the calendar year. We develop this account each year in order to be transparent about what we do, and it also provides us with an opportunity to pause, look back and genuinely assess our work and our performance delivering on our mission.

2015 continued to be a challenging year across the issues and in the areas where we work. But I was so pleased throughout the year with the palpable dedication of our partners and staff who tirelessly work to impact the systems that contribute to human exploitation and oppression. Even in the face of often desperate situations, our extended family is bringing new energy, ideas and enthusiasm to address these widespread and persistent global problems.

Calendar years can be imperfect measurement frameworks for Humanity United because the change we seek in the world isn’t easily realized or measured over twelve months. The global problems we want to address have been around for a long time, so our horizon is over many years and decades. The challenge we face is how do we think about impact and measuring our performance in a way that will allow us to learn but also be transparent and clearly focused. We haven’t exactly solved that yet, but we are committed to doing a better job of it in the future.

In the meantime, while this year’s report provides exact data about our 2015 grants and direct impact activities, some of our program highlights are about programs and initiatives that have taken place over multiple years. I hope you will find it informative and useful, and that it will give you more insight into the work of our organization and our partners. And if you have any thoughts or questions, we welcome your feedback. Please feel free to contact us at info@humanityunited.org.

To learn more about Humanity United, please follow our blog, or follow HU on Facebook, LinkedIn and on Twitter.

Thanks,

Randy Signature

2

Tech Camp Nepal & Migration Learning Tour

By fostering direct interaction between workers and the technology community, our worker-centered design approach to technology seeks to address challenges faced by migrants through practical, scalable solutions.

_

An estimated 1.6 million Nepalis currently work abroad to better their lives and that of their families. Over the years, global media outlets and human rights groups have highlighted the mistreatment and abuse of migrants seeking overseas work, yet each day thousands of would-be migrants start the journey toward foreign employment.

In September 2015, Humanity United, the US Embassy in Nepal, and the State Department Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (JTIP) hosted TechCamp Nepal — a the three-day event in Kathmandu created to pursue tech solutions that reduce exploitation and strengthen protection for Nepali workers. To better understand context and challenges, HU also hosted a weeklong Migration Learning Tour in three districts in Nepal immediately preceding TechCamp.

The Migration Learning Tour and TechCamp Nepal brought together a range of relevant and interested stakeholders including local and international technology experts, former migrant workers, businesses and entrepreneurs, civil society groups and government representatives from the US, Nepal and Qatar.

Among the ideas generated, the solutions selected for development and implementation address two key challenges for Nepali migrants — vulnerabilities caused by recruitment fees and barriers to resolving worker grievances. They are:

These new tech solutions will be piloted in 2016 and deployed for use in 2017.

The Migration Learning Tour and TechCamp Nepal provided the space for learning, collaborative brainstorming, solution design and testing of ideas seeking to improve the lives of migrant workers.


_
As of 2015, more than 1.6 million Nepalis currently work abroad, with many workers coming from “hilly” districts like Tanahu outside of Kathmandu.
_
Creating space for technologists and entrepreneurs to interact directly with migrant workers and source communities is a key to finding relevant and impactful migration solutions.
_
Many migrants work abroad to support their families back home in Nepal. An estimated 600,000 workers currently live and work in the Middle East and other Asian countries.
_
In September 2015, Humanity United hosted TechCamp Nepal in Kathmandu in partnership with the US Embassy in Nepal and the State Department Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (JTIP).
_
Collaboration between businesses, governments, civil society groups and workers is essential to more effective and sustainable migration solutions.
_
Pictured: Catherine Chen, Director of Investments for Humanity United (right) and H.E. Ahmad Jasim Mohammed Ali Al Hamar, Ambassador of the State of Qatar to Nepal (middle)
3

KnowTheChain

A resource for businesses and investors who need to understand and address forced labor abuses within their supply chains.

_

The International Labour Organization estimates that 21 million people around the world are victims of forced labor, and of these people 14.2 million are victims of forced labor in private economic activities. Many of the goods we consume today are produced with forced labor, which make their way into the global economy through complex and opaque supply chains, changing hands many times along the way. Corporations possess significant purchasing power, and we believe they can play an important role in eliminating forced labor from their supply chains.

Almost 21 million people are victims of forced labor around the world. Forced labor in the private economy generates $150 billion in illegal profits every year.
Source: International Labour Organization: www.ilo.org/global/topics/forced-labour/lang--en/index.htm

In 2015, Humanity United announced the expansion of KnowTheChain, a project originally focused on documenting corporate compliance with the California Supply Chain Transparency Act, to a broader focus as a resource for companies and investors to better understand and address forced labor abuses within their supply chains. With this new charge, KnowTheChain will begin publishing sector-level benchmarking reports comparing corporate policies and practices to address these issues. Benchmarks can play a powerful role in encouraging companies to uphold labor standards and protect workers’ rights. But more importantly, they give companies and investors the information necessary to understand performance and examples of good practice. In 2016, KnowTheChain will publish benchmarks across three sectors: information & communication technology, apparel & footwear, and food & beverage.

Rethink Supply Chains

In October 2015, the Partnership for Freedom launched Rethink Supply Chains: The Tech Challenge to Fight Labor Trafficking, an innovation challenge that called for technological solutions that identify and address labor trafficking in global supply chains.

The Partnership for Freedom is a public-private partnership that aims to spur innovative solutions to address trafficking through a series of challenges.

The second of three innovation challenges, Rethink Supply Chains, encouraged solvers to submit solutions on one or more of the following areas: elevating workers’ voices, improving the transparency and accountability of labor recruitment, and enabling better traceability of commodities, products and labor conditions in high-risk supply chains. Check out the winners here.

-
4

Trafficking in Persons Report

We worked to ensure that the TIP Report remains an accurate and powerful diplomatic tool to engage
foreign governments on human trafficking.

_

Humanity United’s policy team, coordinating closely with the Alliance to End Slavery and Trafficking (ATEST), has worked for years to ensure that the State Department’s Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report remains an accurate and powerful diplomatic tool that can effectively persuade nations to combat human trafficking within their borders. 2015 proved to be a particularly challenging year, as the TIP report’s rankings were widely criticized and became a factor in the passage of important trade legislation.

In February 2015 — after testimony by David Abramowitz, Managing Director at HU, and Shawna Bader Blau, Executive Director of Solidarity Center before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee — Senator Bob Menendez of New Jersey successfully included a provision in a trade bill that provided no fast track consideration of any trade agreement that had a country on “tier 3” of the State Department’s TIP report, the lowest ranking. This was the first time a human rights provision of this nature was included in trade legislation and may have contributed to the upgrade of Malaysia from tier 3 in the 2015 TIP report. Many viewed this upgrade as unwarranted given Malaysia’s record of forced labor in electronics production and recent revelations about the mass graves of victims of human trafficking on Malaysian soil. After the publication of the report, HU’s policy team worked intensively to raise awareness of the upgrade in the media and in Congress. These efforts contributed to a highly critical hearing by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Secretary Kerry directly raising human trafficking issues with the Prime Minister of Malaysia and a commitment to a future high-level diplomatic campaign to ensure that countries were on notice in advance of what they had to achieve to be upgraded. The TPP itself contained strong side agreements or “consistency plans” for Malaysia, Vietnam and Brunei, all countries with current or past human trafficking challenges. HU is committed to continuing to press the United States and other governments to be both honest and action oriented in the effort to combat human trafficking.

Casting a Tight Net

In the fall of 2015, Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR) published an in-depth case study of HU’s strategic approach to addressing forced labor in the Thai seafood industry. Thailand is the third largest exporter of seafood in the world, with exports valued at more than $7 billion annually.

Since 2010, HU has worked to disrupt the system that exploits workers by employing a variety of interventions in addition to traditional grantmaking, including commissioning research, convening individuals and organizations working on this issue, developing tools, supporting private sector engagement, advocacy and engaging the media. The SSIR article captures HU’s unique approach and the important work of its expert partners to achieve broad-based change.

-
5

ATEST

A US-based coalition that advocates for solutions to prevent and end all forms of human trafficking and modern-day slavery around the world.

_

Founded in 2007 by Humanity United, the Alliance to End Slavery and Trafficking (ATEST) brings together a diverse coalition of US-based human rights organizations to work towards the shared goal of ending modern slavery and human trafficking around the world. From strengthening laws and business standards to advocating for new federal funding for vital anti-trafficking programs, ATEST works to create fundamental change by addressing the accepted norms that enable modern slavery and human trafficking to persist. ATEST’s bipartisan and consensus-driven approach continues to achieve unprecedented success. Since 2009, the number of departments and independent agencies that are actively working on anti-trafficking programs has nearly tripled; funding for Department of Justice grants for Victims Services and Task Forces has more than quadrupled; funding for the Human Trafficking Prosecution Unit has seen more than a 50% increase; funding for Department of Health and Human Services grants to victims has increased more than 50%; and funding for the Department of State’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons has increased more than 66% in part due to campaigns lead by ATEST. In 2015, ATEST advocated to pass the Survivors of Human Trafficking Empowerment Act (SHTEA), which was enacted as part of the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act (S. 178). The SHTEA established the US Advisory Council on Human Trafficking to review policies and recommend programs on human trafficking. The Council convened for the first time in early 2016.

“Children Don’t Migrate, They Flee”

A project of ATEST and Too Young to Wed, the photo exhibition “Children Don’t Migrate, They Flee” portrays the dire circumstances that compel unaccompanied children and families to flee their homes in the Northern Triangle in Central America, through Mexico and to the US border. These images and stories of the root causes of this mass exodus—violence, corruption, poverty and a climate of impunity help change the narrative of this crisis from security and border enforcement to humanitarianism and compassion.


_
Dayana Lizet Maldonado, 14, is shown in the Central American migrant shelter Los 72 in Tenosique, Mexico, in April 2015. If Dayana survives the treacherous journey, refuge is not guaranteed. The US Border Patrol reports that approximately 84,000 children were apprehended at the Southwest border during the 2014 fiscal year and the first six months of the 2015 fiscal year. The nonpartisan Migration Policy Institute estimates that as of June 2015, over 15,000 of those children had been ordered removed. (Photo by Katie Orlinsky)
_
Paula, who does not attend school, works washing clothes with her female family members in the town of Los Duraznales in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala, in August 2014. Deeply entrenched discrimination against women severely limits educational and employment opportunities for Guatemalan girls and women. The State Department reports a conviction rate of 1 to 2% for femicide, clear evidence that women and girls face a harsh climate of impunity with a government unwilling to offer protection from escalating violence. (Photo by Katie Orlinsky)
_
Ana poses for a portrait at the Central American migrant shelter Los 72 in Tenosique, Mexico, in April 2015. Ana fled Honduras as an unaccompanied child. In Honduras, Ana was homeless and working on her own (as a clown) to support herself. Ana shared that she was recruited as a lookout for gangs and had to flee the country because of the gang’s interest in her, and her inability to support herself. (Photo by Katie Orlinsky)
_
Miriam Gonzalez Ramirez and her baby Carlos Jair Gonzalez Ramirez arrive in Mexico after crossing between Guatemala and the Mexico border by boat in April 2015. For women and girls in Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala, the dangerous journey north is a calculated risk compared to living in fear of gang violence, which is compounded by high levels of domestic and sexual violence and coercion. Girls face gender discrimination in the justice system, along with weak rule of law, corruption, and lack of access to services – all of which pose tremendous barriers to their safety and security. (Photo by Katie Orlinsky)
_
Romina Alonso Lorenzo, 12, left, and Isabel Alonso Lorenzo, eight, at their aunt’s home in Concepcion Chiquirichapa in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala, in August 2014. Romina and Isabel are two of four orphan sisters; their 14-year old sister has recently fled to the United States where she works to help support their family. The other sisters live with their aunt in a crowded two-room home. (Photo by Katie Orlinsky)
_
Isaura Ortega and her baby Cafemin pose for a portrait at a migrant shelter in Mexico City, in April 2015. Isaura was forced to flee her home in Guatemala City because of threats of extreme violence. Isaura’s family owned a grocery story in Guatemala City, and in 2008 criminals began to threaten the family. Gangs killed Isaura’s sister and brother – and kidnapped another sister – because the family refused to pay an extortion fee. When family members fled to Mexico, Isaura stayed behind because she was pregnant, but she soon decided it was too dangerous and made the journey to join her family. (Photo by Katie Orlinsky)
_
A four-year-old recent deportee stands outside her home in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala, with her aunts in August 2014. Along with her mother, she attempted to migrate to the United States on August 7, 2014, but was apprehended in Tuxtla Gutierrez, Mexico. Family members said they were both imprisoned and abused before being deported back to Guatemala. The girl’s mother continues to be unable to eat or speak after the experience. (Photo by Katie Orlinsky)
_
Adonias, 13, sells garlic at El Mercado Terminal, the largest market in Guatemala City, Guatemala, in August 2014. For many children and youth in Guatemala, leaving home and risking the treacherous journey to the United States is perceived as the only chance for leading a dignified life free of violence and fear. According to a 2014 UNHCR study, 38 of 100 Guatemalan children interviewed after arriving in the United States expressed the need for international protection from societal violence – by gangs or other organized crime – or from family abuse. (Photo by Katie Orlinsky)
6

Free and Fair Labor in Palm Oil Production

Palm oil is the world’s most popular vegetable oil. Unfortunately its production often relies on forced labor and other modern forms of slavery.

_

Found in everyday household items, palm oil is the world’s most popular vegetable oil, accounting for more than 30% of global vegetable oil consumption. Since 1990, global demand for cheaply produced palm oil has quintupled, and demand is projected to double by 2030. As consumption grows, there is increased documentation of forced and child labor as well as hazardous working conditions in palm oil plantations. HU has worked to document labor abuses, and we have pressed companies who procure palm oil to take steps to address labor exploitation in their supply chains. In 2014, we convened an unprecedented and diverse alliance of international human rights and environmental organizations to develop a guide for companies that source, trade or produce palm oil to embrace their responsibility to ensure the rights of palm oil workers are respected.

In the spring of 2015, the alliance released the Free and Fair Labor in Palm Oil Production: Principles and Implementation Guidance to provide a normative standard for labor and working conditions on palm oil plantations and palm oil mills. The guide also outlines a set of practices to operationalize the outlined principles. The first of its kind, this guide represents a helpful tool for companies to understand the problem and invest in concrete solutions to improve the lives of millions of workers.

RSPO Workshop

Every year, the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) holds a General Assembly conference for its members. Before the conference kicked off, 32 labor delegates from 18 organizations across Malaysia, Indonesia, and the United States gathered for a weekend workshop to discuss 2016 campaign strategies to advance the rights of palm oil workers. During this event, Humanity United, the International Labor Rights Forum, OPPUK, Rainforest Action Network, Tenaganita and Verité hosted a panel discussion on labor conditions in the palm oil industry. The panel focused its conversation around how companies could assess and proactively address labor and human rights risks in their supply chains using the Free and Fair Labor Principles as a guide. Between this session and various meetings held by HU’s partners, 250 copies of the Free and Fair Labor Principles were distributed at the event.

-
7

Burundi

In early 2015, there were warning signs that civilians in Burundi could face violence in the
lead-up to the presidential elections.

_

The prevention of violent conflict has been a focus of HU since we were founded. At the beginning of 2015, there were initial warning signs that the central African country of Burundi could face violence in the lead-up to controversial presidential elections scheduled that summer. Our initial assessment confirmed that there was a genuine risk of violence over the coming months and that HU could play a critical role in working with others to reduce the risk of violence.

In response, we immediately launched a short-term violence prevention program – combining grantmaking, policy and media work.

Over the course of 2015, the situation in Burundi continued to deteriorate. What initially started as disproportionate violence against largely peaceful protests escalated into a crisis in which most civil society and independent media actors are in exile, hundreds of thousands of civilians are now displaced throughout the region, an opposition alliance is armed and growing more desperate each day and the regime refuses to make meaningful concessions to defuse tensions. Initially an electoral crisis, the situation in Burundi now threatens to spiral into a full-blown civil war.

_
89,000
Internally displaced people
250,000+
Refugees from Burundi in neighboring countries

At each critical juncture, our program has evolved to account for new dynamics and continually strive to mitigate the prospects of violence. HU has worked with Burundian groups to establish a local network for monitoring and responding to potential conflict. We worked with reporters to ensure the violence was being covered for a western audience. In Burundi, we supported Iwacu, the last remaining source of independent news, to keep its doors open during these difficult times. We have also supported behind-the-scenes efforts to initiate an inclusive dialogue process, the only measure that can lay the foundation for a lasting solution.

While we have learned a lot through this work, we also look at the situation on the ground and know that there is still so much work to be done.

HU is firmly committed to the goal of stopping conflict before it starts. Our efforts in Burundi are informing the development of a new body of work focused on prevention and sustainable peace.

As contested presidential elections in Burundi drew near, HU supported the work of photographer Phil Moore and journalist Jessica Hatcher to report from inside the country. Their work documented Burundi’s increasing tension and violence as the political crisis escalated, drawing attention to the rising risk of conflict in a country that is typically under-reported in the Western media. This complemented work that directly supported Burundian media, including grants to the online newspaper Iwacu and media training for Burundian journalists.


_
Photo by Phil Moore<br>A man directs protesters in the Nyakabiga neighbourhood of Bujumbura, Burundi, on May 4, 2015.
_
Photo by Phil Moore<br>A soldier stands next to a gate painted with the Burundian flag at the Prince Rwagasore Stadium in Bujumbura, Burundi, on June 27, 2015, during rehearsals for Independence Day celebrations on July 1st.
_
Photo by Phil Moore<br>Civilians, army soldiers and police queue to vote in the opposition stronghold of Musaga in Bujumbura, Burundi, on June 29, 2015. Burundians voted in parliamentary and local plebiscite under conditions that the African Union declared 'unsuitable for free and fair elections'.
_
Photo by Phil Moore<br>A member of the 'Imbonerakure', the youth-wing of the ruling CNDD-FDD party, is pictured wearing a t-shirt supporting incumbent President Pierre Nkurunziza as he stands under the party flag, at a locally organised CNDD-FDD rally in Kamenge, a pro-government neighbourhood of the capital, on the last day of presidential election campaigning on July 18, 2015 in Bujumbura, Burundi.
_
Photo by Phil Moore<br>Specks of sunlight fall on a wall through a tin-roof pockmarked by shrapnel holes in the bedroom of Suleiman Ndabarushimana (43) in a neighbourhood of Bujumbura, Burundi, on July 27, 2015. Mr. Ndabarushimana was killed on the night of July 26 when a grenade was thrown by an unknown assailant through his bedroom window around midnight, while he lay asleep with his wife. His wife survived, but needed treatment for her injuries.
8

South Sudan: The Search for Peace Continues

In December 2013, an outbreak of violence in the capital of Juba quickly engulfed the country in conflict.
Two years later, South Sudan is still at war.

_

The humanitarian situation in South Sudan remained deadly in 2015, with the continuing civil war increasingly polarizing the country along ethnic and regional lines. Since the outbreak of violence, HU has focused on supporting peacemaking efforts in the region by urging international cooperation to achieve peace between the warring parties. In response to advocacy by a range of organizations, including HU, President Obama made South Sudan a key element in his trip to East Africa in 2015, and the United States worked closely with China to help support peace in the country. These efforts contributed to the successful conclusion of the August 2015 Peace Agreement between the warring parties, which included frameworks for relieving the suffering of the people of South Sudan, accountability for the crimes committed during the conflict and a mechanism to supervise the agreement’s implementation.

1.66M
Internally displaced people
646,000
Refugees from South Sudan in neighboring countries
265,700
Refugees in South Sudan
Source: United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, 2016 Humanitarian Needs Overview, November 2015

In addition to joining the international and regional pressure that helped achieve the Agreement, we are committed to continuing to work with our partners to ensure that the promise of the agreement is reached.

This includes working with partners on the ground to support local peacebuilding efforts. Engaging with the few local actors who still have the trust of the communities that are at risk of a wider conflict, we want to prevent local violence that could undermine the peace agreement and lead to wider conflict that can threaten the country as a whole.

Global Witness

South Sudan is the most oil-dependent economy in the world. In its first five years of independence, the country has already suffered devastating consequences from the deeply intertwined challenges of governance, natural resource wealth and civil war. One of our partners, Global Witness, is engaged in driving accountability within that system. When the main parties to the civil war signed a Peace Agreement in August 2015, they outlined a program for power sharing and reform under a transitional government that included more than two dozen provisions on oil governance. Global Witness developed an urgent, clear report on next steps for responsible resource management, Turning the Tide. The comprehensive briefing has offered welcome policy guidance to the South Sudanese government and the international stakeholders helping to turn the Agreement into a pathway for a peaceful, prosperous South Sudan.

-
9

Liberia

After two protracted civil wars and the devastation of nearly two years spent combatting Ebola,
Liberia has proven to be a resilient and intrepid country.

_

Since 2007, Humanity United has invested more than $13 million in Liberia, supporting Liberian civil society organizations, INGO’s working in-country, and the Liberian government. Over that time, we have supported groups working on a wide range of issues, including access to justice, capacity building support for civil society, conflict early warning, economic development and natural resource management.

Partners like Building Markets have helped local businesses win more than 500 contracts worth $60 million to create thousands of jobs within the community and develop strong relationships with the government. HU’s partnership with Virgin Unite helped to launch the Branson Scholarship Program, an entrepreneurship training program that allowed for the creation of 250 new jobs and the promise of many more.

We worked closely with TrustAfrica to form and support a working group of several organization that came together to monitor Liberia’s natural resource concessions agreements. Since convening in 2013, the Concessions Working Group has become a strong, respected collaborative engaging corporations, communities and the government to better ensure accountability and voice in concessions agreements. HU has also supported the Early Warning Early Response Working Group in the creation of a community-based system for monitoring violence and preventing the escalation of conflict. The group now counts 35 members, with a sophisticated structure that reaches deep into each community in every part of the country.

After two protracted civil wars and the devastation of nearly two years spent combatting Ebola, Liberia has proven to be a resilient and intrepid country. We are proud to have supported Liberia’s future and we hope the programs and groups that our partners have put in place will continue to help the country advance on the path to peace and prosperity.

Africa and the International Criminal Court: Moving The Narrative Forward

The International Criminal Court (ICC) serves an important role in prosecuting individuals charged with genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. In doing so, it strives to prevent future atrocities from occurring. However, it’s support by African countries has hit its lowest point. In October 2013, the African Union convened an Extraordinary Summit to review the relationship between Africa and the ICC. Despite loud calls for African countries to withdraw, there are those who maintain their support. In April 2015, Humanity United launched an ICC blog series to amplify the voices on the issue that aren’t normally covered. Bloggers, selected from across Africa, addressed a wide range of issues surrounding the ICC, including technology, evidence collection, victim participation and strategies to strengthen the ICC.

-
10

Program Data

Total Programmatic Spending

PROGRAMMATIC SPENDING INCLUDES:
GRANTS: Total amount of grants.
DIRECT IMPACT ACTIVITIES (DIAs): Charitable programs and campaigns led by Humanity United.
PROGRAM EXPENSES: Program-related operating expenses.

Project Types

  • Direct Impact Activity
    $2.7m
  • Direct Impact Activity (Lobbying)
    $132k
  • General Support
    $1.2m
  • Lobbying Advocacy
    $113k
  • Project Support
    $15.4m
  • Sponsorship
    $226k
  • Direct Impact Activity
    35
  • Direct Impact Activity (Lobbying)
    1
  • General Support
    10
  • Lobbying Advocacy
    14
  • Project Support
    113
  • Sponsorship
    12

Strategic Initiatives

  • Corporate Engagement
    $3.7m
  • Democratic Republic Of Congo
    $338k
  • International Justice
    $1.6m
  • Liberia
    $1.3m
  • Nepal
    $2.4m
  • Sudan and South Sudan
    $3.3m
  • Building Peace Leadership
    $844k
  • Advancing Freedom Leadership
    $3.1m
  • Atrocity Prevention
    $3.2m
  • Corporate Engagement
    26
  • Democratic Republic Of Congo
    2
  • International Justice
    15
  • Liberia
    8
  • Nepal
    24
  • Sudan and South Sudan
    27
  • Building Peace Leadership
    10
  • Advancing Freedom Leadership
    42
  • Atrocity Prevention
    31
11

Investments List

Global Fairness Initiative

Project Support

$33,900

Kathmandu Living Labs

Project Support

$60,000

Accountability Lab, Inc.

Project Support

$63,000

Global Fairness Initiative

Project Support

$83,200

GoodWeave International

Project Support

$27,600

Global Fairness Initiative

Project Support

$319,400

GoodWeave International

Project Support

$302,200

Centro De Los Derechos Del Migrante, Inc.

Project Support

$108,800

Education Fund of the American Center for International Labor Solidarity

Project Support

$250,000

Business & Human Rights Resource Centre

Project Support

$159,200

Amnesty International Ltd.

Project Support

$176,500

World Education, Inc.

Project Support

$50,000

New York University

Project Support

$125,000

F-1Soft International Pvt. Ltd.

Project Support

$65,000

Techsoup Global

Project Support

$188,000

Manta Consulting, Inc.

Project Support

$120,000

Sustainable Fisheries Advocates

Sponsorships

$4,500

The Freedom Fund

Project Support

$500,000

Human Rights Watch

Project Support

$135,000

Environmental Justice Foundation

Project Support

$205,800

The Sustainability Incubator

Project Support

$86,000

International Labor Rights Forum

Project Support

$55,400

Anti-Slavery International

Project Support

$75,000

Sustainable Fisheries Advocates

Project Support

$10,000

Verité, Inc.

Project Support

$120,000

Education Fund of the American Center for International Labor Solidarity

Project Support

$69,700

Project Provenance Ltd.

Project Support

$125,000

Made In A Free World, Inc.

Project Support

$250,000

Institute for Human Rights and Business

Project Support

$294,800

Thomson Reuters Foundation

Sponsorships

$50,000

LaborVoices

Project Support

$189,000

As You Sow

Project Support

$100,000

Coalition of Immokalee Workers

Project Support

$300,000

Verité, Inc.

General Support

$400,000

The Freedom Fund

Project Support

$85,000

Henry Dunant Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue

Project Support

$110,000

International Refugee Rights Initiative

Project Support

$199,600

African Centre for Justice and Peace Studies

General Support

$100,000

International Refugee Rights Initiative

Project Support

$132,100

Sudan Sunrise, Inc.

Project Support

$65,600

International Refugee Rights Initiative

Project Support

$105,000

Sudan Sunrise, Inc.

General Support

$30,000

U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum

Sponsorships

$10,000

Darfur Women Action Group

Sponsorships

$8,500

International Refugee Rights Initiative

Project Support

$375,000

International Refugee Rights Initiative

Project Support

$140,000

Sudan Tribune

Project Support

$300,000

Saferworld

Project Support

$175,000

Sudan Sunrise, Inc.

Project Support

$30,800

Boston College Trustees

Project Support

$9,000

Sudan Sunrise, Inc.

Project Support

$19,800

Justice Africa

Project Support

$211,500

Global Witness

Project Support

$160,000

Nonviolent Peaceforce

Project Support

$300,000

Regents of the University of California at Berkeley

Project Support

$225,000

Center for American Progress

Project Support

$400,000

Global Witness

Project Support

$150,000

The College of William and Mary

Project Support

$115,200

Center for Global Development

Project Support

$83,900

TrustAfrica

Project Support

$300,000

Building Markets, Ltd.

Project Support

$300,000

Spark

Project Support

$299,100

Tides Foundation

Project Support

$10,000

Spark

Project Support

$60,000

International Commission of Jurists — Kenya Section

Project Support

$200,000

International Commission of Jurists — Kenya Section

Project Support

$90,000

Redress Trust Ltd.

Project Support

$60,000

InformAction Ltd.

Project Support

$75,000

Human Rights Watch

Project Support

$30,000

International Federation on Human Rights

Project Support

$100,000

Art Works Projects

Project Support

$60,000

World Federalist Movement

Project Support

$150,000

U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum

Project Support

$70,600

Witness, Inc.

Project Support

$100,000

Carnegie Mellon University

Project Support

$100,000

Access Now

Project Support

$20,000

United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR)

Project Support

$156,200

Carnegie Mellon University

Project Support

$175,000

Regents of the University of California at Berkeley

Project Support

$200,000

Wildlife Conservation Global, Inc.

Project Support

$10,000

New York University

Project Support

$328,300

Search for Common Ground

Project Support

$155,000

Human Rights Watch

Project Support

$74,000

President and Fellows of Harvard College

Sponsorships

$10,000

Filmmakers Collaborative, Inc.

Project Support

$15,800

UN Office of the Special Advisers on the Prevention of Genocide and Responsibility to Protect

Project Support

$102,900

Security Council Report, Inc.

General Support

$150,000

Iwacu

Project Support

$67,900

Peace Direct, Inc.

Project Support

$160,700

Institute for Security Studies

Project Support

$83,400

Research Foundation of the CUNY on behalf of the Graduate Center of CUNY

Project Support

$203,500

U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum

Project Support

$200,000

Foundation for the Graduate Institute of International Relations and Development

Project Support

$262,700

Saferworld

Project Support

$128,900

International Crisis Group

Project Support

$200,000

Henry Dunant Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue

Project Support

$236,000

CDA Collaborative Learning Projects, Inc.

Project Support

$230,000

Peace Direct, Inc.

Project Support

$155,700

Search for Common Ground

General Support

$200,000

Human Rights Watch

Project Support

$100,000

The Philanthropy Workshop

General Support

$50,000

The Freedom Fund

Project Support

$777,500

Free the Slaves

Project Support

$45,000

Safe Horizon

Project Support

$48,000

Polaris Project

Project Support

$41,900

World Vision

Project Support

$46,700

Verité, Inc.

Project Support

$57,000

Vital Voices Global Partnership, Inc.

Project Support

$40,000

Education Fund of the American Center for International Labor Solidarity

Project Support

$40,000

End Child Prostitution and Trafficking (ECPAT)

Project Support

$40,000

Coalition to Abolish Slavery & Trafficking

Project Support

$48,000

Coalition of Immokalee Workers

Project Support

$46,700

International Justice Mission

Project Support

$40,000

National Domestic Workers Alliance, Inc.

Project Support

$40,000

Futures Without Violence

Project Support

$43,900

National Network for Youth, Inc.

Project Support

$40,000

International Center for Research on Women

Sponsorships

$10,000

World Affairs Council of Northern California

Sponsorships

$50,000

William J. Clinton Foundation

Sponsorships

$19,000

Advocacy Project

Project Support

$15,000

Trustees of the Smith College

Project Support

$20,000

Bay Area Anti-Trafficking Coalition

Sponsorships

$10,000

Equal Justice Initiative

General Support

$10,000

Physicians for Human Rights, Inc.

Sponsorships

$10,000

Stanford University, Department of History

Project Support

$5,400

New Venture Fund

Project Support

$30,000

William J. Clinton Foundation

Sponsorships

$19,000

Internews Network

Sponsorships

$25,000

Human Rights First

General Support

$200,000

Dream Corps

Project Support

$50,000

Equal Justice Initiative

General Support

$50,000

Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights

Project Support

$400,000

The Desmond and Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation NPC

General Support

$50,000

FCNL Education Fund

Project Support

$50,000

Free the Slaves

Lobbying

$5,000

Safe Horizon

Lobbying

$12,000

Polaris Project

Lobbying

$8,100

World Vision

Lobbying

$3,300

Verité, Inc.

Lobbying

$3,000

Vital Voices Global Partnership, Inc.

Lobbying

$10,000

Education Fund of the American Center for International Labor Solidarity

Lobbying

$10,000

End Child Prostitution and Trafficking (ECPAT)

Lobbying

$10,000

Coalition to Abolish Slavery & Trafficking

Lobbying

$12,000

Coalition of Immokalee Workers

Lobbying

$3,400

International Justice Mission

Lobbying

$10,000

National Domestic Workers Alliance, Inc.

Lobbying

$10,000

Futures Without Violence

Lobbying

$6,100

National Network for Youth, Inc.

Lobbying

$10,000

The Guardian

DIA

$300,000

Alliance to End Slavery and Trafficking (ATEST)

DIA

$418,000

The Freedom Fund

DIA

$63,200

Palm Oil Principles: Follow-on Engagement

DIA

$64,900

Better Brick Nepal Season 1 Stakeholder Meeting

DIA

$18,100

N-Q Project Consultant

DIA

$61,000

Research on Migrant Worker Use of Technology

DIA

$119,900

KnowTheChain

DIA

$351,200

Support for Journalist Investigating Seafood for SSIR

DIA

$7,000

N-Q Tech Solutions Migration Learning Tour and TechCamp Nepal

DIA

$35,600

Migrant Rights Organization Consultant

DIA

$12,900

Research & Learning: Thai Seafood

DIA

$57,000

Support for Journalist Investigating Seafood in Europe

DIA

$12,100

Partnership for Freedom Challenge II - Administration

DIA

$247,400

Supply Chain Solutions Fund

DIA

$39,000

Advocacy Meeting

DIA

$6,500

Construction Industry Consortium Consultancy

DIA

$39,000

Better Brick Nepal Curriculum Development

DIA

$1,100

Peacebuilding and Human Rights Promotion through Media

DIA

$4,000

Peacebuilding and Human Rights Promotion through Media Phase II

DIA

$35,000

Senior Peacebuilding Fellows

DIA

$280,500

Safety Fund Research Initiative — Awareness and Learning

DIA

$7,800

Convening Practitioners to Discuss Healing and Reconciliation Approaches

DIA

$121,600

Safety Fund Research Initiative — Proposal

DIA

$38,800

Support for Sudan Arria at UN

DIA

$4,300

Diaspora Participation in 8-15 South Sudan Negotiations

DIA

$2,600

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Research

DIA

$50,000

Burundi: Freelance Media Coverage

DIA

$10,500

Project Expedite Justice

DIA

$128,600

Conference on Positive Peace

DIA

$60,500

Burundi Evaluation

DIA

$65,200

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Collaborative Research Project

DIA

$35,000

Burundi Inclusive Dialogue Convening in DC

DIA

$1,600

Peacebuilding Workshops with Senior Members of Burundian Defense Forces

DIA

$11,500

Research and Mapping — South Sudanese Diaspora

DIA

$4,000

Alliance to End Slavery and Trafficking (ATEST)

DIA Lobbying

$131,700